Bloomberg EDU PODCASTS:

 

March 14, 2015 – Arne Duncan on Early Childhood Education and Racist Chanting by University of Oklahoma Fraternity Listen here U.S. Education Secretary Arne Duncan comments on the racist chanting by University of Oklahoma fraternity members and how government resources should be spent on early childhood education. John Hechinger of Bloomberg News, Alyson Klein of Education Week and Andrew Rotherham of Bellwether Education discuss the No Child Left Behind effort and teacher training. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

March 7, 2015 – Louisiana School System, Master’s Degree From a Museum Listen here John White, Louisiana superintendent of education, discusses education challenges in the state, the charter experiment in New Orleans and the intersection of politics and education. Ellen Futter, president of the American Museum of Natural History, talks about its commitment to education and its Master’s and Ph.D. programs and the construction of a new building for the museum. “Honor Roll” profiles a middle school Lego Robotics Club. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

February 28, 2015 – Reforming Newark Schools, Civics Exam for Students Listen here Cami Anderson, superintendent of Newark public schools, talks about the challenge of reforming the low-performing district. Sam Stone, executive director of the Civics Education Initiative and Donna Phillips, a social studies teacher and civics education researcher, discuss proposed legislation requiring high school seniors to pass a test on U.S. history and civics. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

February 21, 2015 – The Mission and Future of Teach for America Listen here Elisa Villanueva Beard, co-chief executive officer of Teach for America, discusses the organization’s commitment to recruiting and training college graduates and professionals to teach in urban and rural communities and for its members to make a positive impact on educational equity. In “Honor Roll,” Monica Bertran talks with a principal who raised money to buy shoes, boots and more for every student in her school. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

February 14, 2015 – The Case for Taking a Gap Year Before College Listen here Joe O’Shea, director of undergraduate research and academic engagement at Florida State University and author of “Gap Year: How Delaying College Changes People in Ways the World Needs,” discusses advantages of high school graduates delaying college for a year. Willy Oppenheim, founder and director of Omprakash, Scott Meiklejohn, dean of admissions at Bowdoin College and Holly Bull, president of the Center for Interim Programs, share their insight on the topic. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

February 7, 2015 – Lowell Milken Discusses Milken Educator Awards Listen here Lowell Milken, co-founder and chairman of the Milken Family Foundation, discusses its commitment to education and recognizing outstanding teachers. Three recipients, Wade Whitehead, Cindy Moss and Nader Twal, talk about the impact the award has had on their careers. “Honor Roll” profiles the Sphinx Organization and its dedication to increasing the number of black and latino musicians in classical music orchestras.Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

January 31, 2015 – Television Writer Turned Teacher and a Project-Based High School in California Listen here Former television writer Ellie Herman talks about her experience as a first time teacher. Beth Garoupa, dean of curriculum and instruction at The Center for Advance Research and Technology (CART), discusses its education reform model. “Honor Roll” profiles React to Film, a program designed to teach at-risk students documentary filmmaking and address social justice issues. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

January 24, 2015 – State of the Union Reaction and Protecting Student Data Listen here Bloomberg News education reporters John Hechinger and Janet Lorin discuss President Barack Obama’s proposal for free community college tuition and plan to protect student data and privacy. Jim Steyer, chief executive officer of Common Sense Media, discusses student data and internet privacy. In Honor Roll, Monica Bertran profiles Read and Ride, a classroom program that let’s students cycle while they read. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

January 17, 2015 – Education Reporters Discuss Top Issues for 2015 Listen here Elizabeth Green of Chalkbeat, John Hechinger of Bloomberg News, Alyson Klein of Education Week and Andrew Rotherham of Bellwether Education discuss topics that they think will lead the 2015 education conversation. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

January 10, 2015 – Co-Principals Work to Improve Underperforming School Listen here Lynn Moody, superintendent of the Rowan-Salisbury school system in North Carolina, discusses her hiring of co-principals to turn around a low performing school in her district. Latoya Dixon and Michael Waiksnis, the co-principals, talk about why they accepted this position. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

December 19, 2014 – Compass Charter School Directors on Teaching Methods Listen here Compass Charter School founders and directors Michelle Healy, Brooke Peters and Todd Sutler talk about their school in Brooklyn, New York and methods of progressive teaching. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

December 11, 2014 – Proposals to Strengthen Teacher Prep; Greater Investment in Early Childhood Education Listen here U.S. Undersecretary of Education Ted Mitchell discusses proposals to strengthen teacher preparation. Political advisors Kevin Madden and Jim Messina talk about their support for greater investment in early childhood education and their hope that it is a prominent topic in the next presidential election. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

December 4, 2014 – Eva Moskowitz Discusses Success Academy Charter Schools Listen here Eva Moskowitz, founder and chief executive officer of Success Academy Charter Schools in New York, discusses the growth of Success schools from one in 2006 to 32 today and the schools’ achievements and challenges. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

November 21, 2014 – Challenges for School Counselors Listen here Mandy Savitz-Romer, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, and high school counselors Melissa Beverly and Shari Sevier discuss challenges that school counselors face, including large caseloads and helping students with the college application process. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

November 13, 2014 – Burris, Ellsperman Debate the Common Core Standards Listen hereCarol Burris, principal at South Side High School in Rockville Center, New York and Jayne Ellsperman, principal at West Port High School in Ocala, Florida discuss their opposing views about the Common Core Standards. “Honor Roll” profiles Shane’s Inspiration and efforts to build playgrounds for children of all abilities. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

November 7, 2014 – Barksdale, Loome on Underfunded Mississippi Schools Listen here Claiborne Barksdale, former chief executive officer of the Barksdale Reading Institute and Nancy Loome, executive director of the Parents’ Campaign discuss cuts in Mississippi school funding that has put the state near the bottom nationally in per pupil expenditures. They talk with Jane Williams on Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

October 30, 2014 – Author Hobbs on “Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace” Listen hereRobert Peace was an African-American Yale University graduate and an almost straight-A student in molecular biophysics and biochemistry. He also dealt marijuana. Peace was shot dead in 2011 at the age of 30. His life and death is the subject of “The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace.” It is written by Peace’s college roommate, Jeff Hobbs who talks with Jane Williams, host of Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.” Also available on ITunes

Also available on ITunes
October 30, 2014 – Philadelphia School Superintendent on Teacher Lawsuit Listen hereMembers of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers will have to begin paying a portion of their health-insurance costs if the School Reform Commission gets its way. The issue is now in the courts. Superintendent William Hite Jr. talks about the controversy and the struggle to gain more funding for the district. Jane Williams, hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.”

Also available on ITunes
October 24, 2014 – John Gomperts and Laysha Ward Discuss Helping High School Dropouts Listen here1.2 million U.S. high school students drop out each year. The consequences include being less likely to be employed, earn higher income and more likely to get involved in criminal behavior. John Gomperts, president of America’s Promise and Laysha Ward, president of community relations for Target discuss efforts to get high school dropouts back on track. They talk with Jane Williams on Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.”

October 17, 2014 – Sal Khan and Reed Hastings Discuss Commitment to Education Reform Listen here Khan Academy founder Sal Khan and Netflix Chief Executive Officer Reed Hastings spoke at the first annual Vanity Fair New Establishment Summit on October 8 in San Francisco. Both men are becoming more involved in education reform. Jane Williams, host of “Bloomberg EDU” moderated the discussion and shares highlights on Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.”

October 10, 2014 – Educators4Excellence Founders Discuss the Mission to Give Teachers a Greater Voice About Education Listen here
Evan Stone and Sydney Morris, co-founders and co-chief executive officers of Educators4Excellence discuss the mission to give teachers a greater voice both inside and outside of the classroom. Their organization works to ensure teachers have input into policy that impacts education. Three E4E teachers share their experiences with the group. “Bloomberg Honor Roll” explores the history of the Golden Apple Awards. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.”

October 2, 2014 – Dan Cardinali Discusses Absenteeism in Schools Listen here
Dan Cardinali, president of Communities in Schools, discusses efforts to decrease school absenteeism and the number of students who drop out completely. “Bloomberg Honor Roll” talks about providing school supplies for students in need. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.”

October 2, 2014 – Bloomfield, Bertram-Gallant Discuss Cheating in Schools Listen here
Tricia Bertram-Gallant, a lecturer at Rady School of Management University of California, San Diego and David Bloomfield, professor of educational leadership, law and policy at Brooklyn College and CUNY Graduate Center comment on the cheating scandal in Atlanta public schools and reasons behind cheating. Jane Williams hosts Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.”

September 25, 2014 – Education Secretary Arne Duncan on NFL Abuse Scandal Listen here Arne Duncan, U.S. secretary of education, comments on the effect of the NFL abuse scandal on young people. He also talks about keeping children in school and the possibility of a residency program for teachers. In addition, the 2014 Broad Prize winners talk with Jane Williams on Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.”

September 19, 2014 – New Ways to Train Teachers Listen here Ron Thorpe, president and chief executive officer of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards believes teachers should be required to do residencies, much like doctors. Mark Tucker, president and chief executive officer of the National Center on Education and the Economy has written about changing the accountability system in education. They talk with Jane Williams on Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.”

August 28, 2014 – AFT’s Weingarten on Teacher Tenure Debate Listen here Randi Weingarten, president of The American Federation of Teachers, shares her point of view on the lawsuit filed in Albany seeking to end teacher tenure in New York.

August 21, 2014 – Campbell Brown and David Boies Talk About The Fight to End Teacher Tenure Listen here
Former CNN anchor Campbell Brown, now an advocate for education reform and founder of Partnership for Educational Justice, discusses her role in publicly supporting the lawsuit filed by seven families from New York State seeking to end teacher tenure. Famed trial lawyer David Boies, joins the conversation to explain why he is aligning himself with the cause. Boise led the charge that overturned California’s same-sex marriage ban. And in Honor Roll, Monica Bertran talks with 2 teenage winners of this year’s Scholastic Arts Awards.

July 25, 2014 – College Board’s David Coleman Says “Numbers Must Change” Listen here
David Coleman, president and chief executive officer of the College Board, discusses his role in the creation of the Common Core State Standards and a path toward college that extends from kindergarten to Advanced Placement exams and the SAT college admission test. This is an excerpt from his conversation with Bloomberg Radio’s Jane Williams recorded on July 1 at the Aspen Ideas Festival. View the entire exchange here: is.gd/eAcsuC

On the Honor Roll: Monica Bertan talks with Gary Dennis, executive director of Augusta, Georgia’s Jessye Norman School of the Arts.

July 18, 2014 – New Leaders on Improving Community, Teachers and Tests Listen here
Anne Williams-Isom, Harlem Children’s Zone new chief executive officer, discusses community transformation through education and place-based services for vulnerable children and their families. Lily Eskelsen García, president-elect of the National Education Association (NEA), discusses teachers, testing and the NEA’s call for Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s resignation.

July 11, 2014 – Monty Roessel on Bureau of Indian Education, W.K. Kellogg Fellows on Children in New Mexico Listen here Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) Director Charles “Monty” Roessel talks with Bloomberg Radio’s Jane Williams about plans to advance achievement and promote tribal control in BIE-funded schools.
On the Roundtable, W.K. Kellogg Foundation Program Officer Esther Nieves and Fellows Moises Padilla, an educator, and Theresa Pasqual, historic preservationist, discuss improving outcomes for vulnerable children in New Mexico through community-based leadership and education.

July 3, 2014 – Sandra Day O’Connor, Teachers on Civics and U.S. History Listen here
Sandra Day O’Connor, former Supreme Court justice, discusses public education and the need for civics instruction.
On the Roundtable, teachers Diana Laufenberg, Stephen Moreno and Emily Flores discuss student understanding and engagement regarding U.S. history. These segments originally aired in July 2011 and June 2012.

TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE here!

June 27, 2014 – Walton Family Foundation’s Sternberg On Education Reform, Panel On Summer Programs Listen here Marc Sternberg, director of the Walton Family Foundation’s K-12 Education Reform Focus Area, discusses grantees including charter schools, public policy, advocacy and his Teach for America experience.
On the Roundtable, Sarah Pitcock, chief executive officer of the National Summer Learning Association, and Julie McCalmont, coordinator of Summer Learning Programs for California’s Oakland Unified School District, discuss high-quality programs and community school districts serving the entire child.

June 20, 2014 – Gov. Bob Wise on Common Core, Writers on Vergara Ruling Listen here
Bob Wise, former governor of West Virginia and president of the Alliance for Excellent Education, discusses Common Core State Standards, digital learning, and teaching as a profession. Writers, Nan Austin for the “Modesto Bee,” John Fensterwald of “EdSource Today,” and Andrew J. Rotherham of Bellwether Education and “Real Clear Education,” discuss last week’s Vergara v. California ruling on teacher tenure and dismissal.

June 14, 2014 – LeVar Burton on Reading Rainbow Redux, Students on College Prep Listen here
Actor, producer and education advocate LeVar Burton discusses his Kickstarter campaign to fund and expand “Reading Rainbow,” a PBS children’s television series turned app. On the Roundtable, College Track alumna Christina Seruge, a student at San Francisco University, Rainier Scholar Ellis Simani, a Claremont McKenna student, and Sponsors for Educational Opportunity Scholar Victor Tavarez, who will graduate New York City’s Murry Bergtraum High School at month’s end and begin Carnegie Mellon University in the fall, discuss academic, emotional and social supports in college readiness and completion programs.

June 7, 2014 – Nikole Hannah-Jones on “Segregation “NOW,” Historians on D-Day Anniversary Listen here
Nikole Hannah-Jones, an investigative reporter for ProPublica, discusses modern segregation of schools and rezoning of districts since the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision to integrate schools. History teachers Betty Brandenburg of the Department of Defense Education Activity, Diana Laufenberg of Inquiry Schools, and Tim Bailey for the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History discuss how they teach historic events.

May 30 – 2014 Teacher of the Year Sean McComb, Millennials on Work-Life Balance Listen here
Sean McComb, 2014 National Teacher of the Year, who teaches English at Patapsco High School & Center for the Arts in Maryland’s Baltimore County Public Schools, discusses his career. On the Roundtable, educators Justin Minkel of Arkansas, José Luis Vilson of New York, and Shakera Walker of Boston discuss a generational shift in what teachers want from the workplace including flexible hours, autonomy, and professional development.

May 23, 2014 – Common Sense Media’s Jim Steyer, Reporters on Student Data and Privacy Listen here
James Steyer, chief operating officer and founder, Common Sense Media, Anya Kamenetz, NPR’s lead education blogger, and Benjamin Herold, staff writer for “Education Week,” discuss declining reading-rates among teenagers, using data well and what everyone needs to know about student privacy.

May 16, 2014 – NY State Board of Regents Chancellor Tisch, Amplify’s Larry Berger on Reshaping Education Listen here
Merryl Tisch, chancellor, New York State Board of Regents, discusses policy and raising standards and opportunities for students across the state’s 700 public school districts. Larry Berger, president of Amplify Learning, a division of Amplify which is an independent subsidiary of News Corp., discusses the company’s hardware and software – tablets and digital curriculum – designed to enhance the teacher’s role, student learning and assessment.

May 9, 2014 – Teachers Union President Weingarten Will Seek Reelection Listen here
American Federation of Teachers President Randi Weingarten discusses teacher appreciation, respect and dignity, her bid for reelection in July, the roll of teachers’ unions in 2014, and her hope to “reclaim the promise of public education – the anchor of democracy, the propeller of economy.”

May 2, 2014 – Fundraiser Mark Gleason, Reporters On Philadelphia Schools Listen here
Mark Gleason, executive director of Philadelphia School Partnership (PSP), discusses the organization’s mission to raise money, invest and expand “great schools” in the city of brotherly love. Education reporters Kristen Graham, “Philadelphia Inquirer,” Benjamin Herold, “Education Week,” and Kevin McCorry, “Philadelphia Public School Notebook” and WHYY Radio, discuss the 2001 state takeover of Philadelphia schools, budget and staff cuts, student achievement and violence.

More: Kristen Graham was among the The Philadelphia Inquirer team that won a Pulitzer Prize for public service.

April 25, 2014 – Scholastic’s Margery Mayer, Teacher Leaders on Voice Listen here
Margery Mayer, executive vice president and president, Scholastic Education, discusses a survey of 20,000 public school teachers from 50 states. Educators Geneviève DeBose for the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, James Liou of Boston Public Schools, and Justin Minkel, the 2007 Arkansas Teacher of the Year, discuss transforming the teaching profession, education policy and “Teach to Lead,” a new teacher leadership initiative introduced by Secretary of Education Arne Duncan.

April 17, 2014 – School Food Leaders on Nutrition, Healthy Choices Listen here
Rachel Johnson, University of Vermont Professor of Nutrition and American Heart Association National Spokesperson discusses childhood obesity and elementary school “Teaching Gardens.” On the Roundtable, food service directors David Binkle, Los Angeles Unified School District, Jessica Shelly, Cincinnati Public Schools, and Sunny Young, Mississippi’s Good Food for Oxford Schools, discuss the combined 700,000 meals they serve each school day and First Lady Michelle Obama’s “Let’s Move” initiative to encourage healthy eating and exercise among students and their families.

April 11, 2014 – Reporters on New York City School Policies, Leaders Listen here
Bloomberg News reporter Laura Colby discusses her recent story on New York City’s charter school expansion. Lindsey Christ, NY1, Geoff Decker, “Chalkbeat New York,” and Eliza Shapiro, “Capital New York,” discuss co- location of schools, pre-K, arts and after-school programs, high-stakes testing and whether or not New York City, the country’s largest school district, is reflective of the national education landscape.

March 28, 2014 – Ron and Cornelia Suskind on Autism, Disney and Real Life Heroes Listen here
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Ron Suskind and his wife, Cornelia, also a journalist, discuss Ron’s new book, “Life, Animated: A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes, and Autism,” and their family’s 20-year odyssey in connecting with each other through Disney and other movies. The transcript is posted here.

An excerpt of Suskind’s book, Life, Animated, appeared in The New York Times Magazine on March 9, 2014 with a short film of Ron and Owen by documentarian Roger Ross Williams. Click to read, view, ponder.

March 21, 2014 – Catherine Lhamon, District Leaders on Positive School Discipline Listen here
Catherine E. Lhamon, assistant secretary for civil rights at the U.S. Department of Education, Tisha Edwards, Baltimore City Schools interim chief executive officer, and Robert Runcie, Broward County Public Schools superintendent, discuss “zero tolerance” guidelines for non- violent behavior, racial disparities in school discipline, and creating a positive school climate.

March 14, 2014 – Jim Simons on Math for America, Teachers on Pi Day, Math & Common Core Listen hereJames H. Simons, chairman of the Simons Foundation and board chairman of Renaissance Technologies LLC, discusses Math for America and K-12 mathematics teacher training and support. Teachers William Day, Jessica Griffin and Chris Luzniak discuss math content, critical thinking and the Common Core State Standards.

March 7, 2014 – Charlotte Danielson on Teacher Evaluation, Education Reporters on Common Core Listen here Educational consultant Charlotte Danielson discusses her framework for good teaching, staff development, mentoring and coaching. Education reporters Sarah Butrymowicz, of “The Hechinger Report,” Andrew Ujifusa, of “Education Week,” and Erin Richards, of the “Milwaukee Journal Sentinel,” discuss the growing political debate over Common Core State Standards implementation.

Common Core 101: A Primer to Separate Fact From Ficton, by Erin Richards, Journal Sentinel

February 28, 2014 – Justin & Lauran Tuck On College Savings | Educators on K-12 Financial Literacy Listen here New York Giants defensive end Justin Tuck and his wife, Lauran Tuck, an education advocate, discuss college savings for low-income students, summer learning loss and “Tuck’s R.U.S.H. for Literacy.” On the Roundtable, David Anderson, executive vice president, “w!se,” Working in Support of Education, Lennette Coleman, principal, Chicago’s Ariel Community Academy, and Catherine McRoy-Mendell, a New York City social studies and economics teacher, discuss elementary and secondary education financial literacy programs.

February 21, 2014 – Researchers On Free & Reduced Lunch, The Opportunity Gap Listen here Jessica Donze Black, director of the Pew Charitable Trusts’ Kids’ Safe and Healthful Foods Project, discusses the National School Lunch Program that provides low- cost or free lunches to children. Professors Prudence Carter and Sean Reardon of Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education, and Kevin G. Welner, director of the National Education Policy Center, University of Colorado at Boulder, discuss disparities in children’s school performance, including causes, consequences and possible policy solutions based on research.

February 14, 2014 – Dean Ball on Teacher Education, School Founders Odyssey Listen here Deborah Loewenberg Ball, dean of the University of Michigan School of Education, discusses teachers’ professional training and experience. Michelle Healy, Brooke Peters and Todd Sutler, Brooklyn Compass Charter School co- founders, discuss inquiry-based learning, community outreach and co-location. Geoffrey Canada, Harlem Children’s Zone president and chief executive officer, discusses stepping down.

February 7, 2014 – Geoff Canada on Mayoral Control of Schools Listen here Geoffrey Canada, president and chief executive officer of New York City’s Harlem Children’s Zone, a provider of educational, medical and health services for children from birth through college, discusses Mayor Bill de Blasio and the debate over charter and traditional public schools and universal early childhood education.

February 7, 2014 – Duncan Says Preschool Is ‘Ultimate Bipartisan Issue’Listen here U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan discusses parent-teacher and community partnerships, Common Core State Standards, high-speed Internet service for schools and libraries, and a coalition to expand quality early childhood education. “If Congress wants to become less dysfunctional and more functional, there’s no better place than around education,” Duncan said

January 31, 2014 – Astronaut Chris Hadfield, Science Teachers on Discovery Listen here Chris Hadfield, Canadian astronaut, commander of the international space station and author of “An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth,” discusses interacting with students on earth and lessons learned in space. High school teachers, Frank Noschese, Susan Matthews, and Shawn Cornally, discuss “doing science” and project-based learning.

January 24, 2014 – Marwell, Culatta on Connectivity, Clay Roy on Community Listen here
Evan Marwell, chief executive officer and co-founder of Education SuperHighway, and Richard Culatta, director of the Office of Educational Technology for the U.S. Department of Education, discuss digital learning, e-rate and high-speed Internet access in public schools. Elizabeth Clay Roy, chief strategy officer at Phipps Community Development Corporation, discusses educational and work-readiness programs for children and families.

January 17, 2014 – Reporters Discuss Education Issues to Watch in 2014 Listen here
Education writers Philissa Cramer, John Hechinger, Alyson Klein and Joy Resmovits discuss Congressional gridlock on education policies, the Common Core controversy, teacher evaluations, “Elementary and Secondary Education Act” waivers, funding and access to early childhood and higher education, and the retirement of Rep. George Miller, a California Democrat.

January 15, 2014 – AFT’s Weingarten on Education in ’14, Roundtable on Teacher Networks Listen here
Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, discusses her education outlook for 2014, the Common Core State Standards, and the power of Twitter. Eric Westendorf, chief executive officer and co-founder of LearnZillion, Pat Wasley, chief executive officer of the Teaching Channel, and Kevyn Klein, customer support manager for Edmodo, discuss web-based networks for teachers.

December 19, 2013 – Author Goleman, Pediatricians Bertin and Klass on Focus Listen here Daniel Goleman, psychologist, former New York Times science writer and best-selling author discusses his newest publication, “Focus: The Hidden Driver of Excellence.” Pediatricians Perri Klass, professor of journalism and pediatrics at New York University’s Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute and Mark Bertin, assistant professor of pediatrics at New York Medical College and author of “The Family ADHD Solution,” discuss identifying and treating ADHD in children.

December 13, 2013 – Common Sense CEO James Steyer, Harvard Professor of Education Howard Gardner Discuss ‘App Generation’ Listen here James Steyer, chief operating officer and founder, Common Sense Media, and Howard Gardner, a professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education and author of “The App Generation: How Today’s Youth Navigate Identity, Intimacy, and Imagination in a Digital World,” discuss how media and technology are affecting children’s cognitive, social, and emotional development.

December 6, 2013 – Economist Marguerite Roza, Donors Choose Founder Charles Best on Education Economics Listen here Marguerite Roza, Ph.D., director of the Edunomics Lab at Georgetown University and senior research affiliate at the Center on Reinventing Public Education (CRPE) discusses the “ins and outs” public school funding. Charles Best, founder and chief executive officer of DonorsChoose.org, science teachers Dylan Besk, School of Engineering and Sciences, Sacramento, California, and Kelvin Smith, Kipp Ways Academy, Atlanta, Georgia, discuss Chevron’s Fuel Your School campaign and matching donors with teachers’ classroom needs.

November 29, 2013 – Educators on the Complexities of Teaching Thanksgiving, U.S. History Listen here
Robert Freeman, author of the “One-Hour History” series and a teacher at Los Altos High School in California, Josh Bill, Waukegan High School history teacher in Illinois, Betty Brandenburg, of Walker Intermediate School in Fort Knox, Kentucky, and Stacy Hoeflich, from Lyles-Crouch Traditional Academy in Alexandria, Virginia discuss methods of teaching history, social engagement and civics.

November 22, 2013 – Tom Harkin Says We Are Missing the Boat in Education Listen here
Democratic Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa discusses the “Strong Start for America’s Children Act,” Common Core State Standards, reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the impact of John F. Kennedy’s assassination on his public service career.

November 22, 2013 – Stanford’s Rob Reich on Private Money, Public School Funding Listen here
Rob Reich, Stanford University associate professor of political science, director of the Program on Ethics in Society and co-director of the Center for Philanthropy and Civil Society, discusses strategic giving, school financing and philanthropy in public education today.

November 15, 2013 – Bridgeport Schools Superintendent Paul Vallas Discusses His Tenure Listen here
Paul Vallas, departing Bridgeport public schools superintendent, discusses urban school reform. He will run for lieutenant governor of Illinois in 2014. Writers Linda Lambeck of the Connecticut Post, and Sarah Carr, author of “Hope Against Hope,” discuss the district leader’s style, systems of change and sustainability.

Note: On Friday, November 15, 2013, the Connecticut Supreme Court overturned a lower court decision that ruled Bridgeport Schools Superintendent Paul Vallas lacked qualifications for his superintendency. See Linda Lambeck’s Connecticut Post story, Court Overturns Vallas Ouster.

November 8, 2013 – Business Roundtable Recognizes Five “Outstanding” K-12 Programs Listen here
Dane Linn, Business Roundtable (BRT) vice president, Nancy A. Madden, Success for All co-founder, Ellen Moir, New Teacher Center founder, and Matthew Peterson, MIND Research Institute co-founder and ST Math creator, discuss the BRT’s recognition of five “outstanding” K-12 programs working to prepare students for college and the workplace.

November 1, 2013 – Robert Putnam, Jane Quinn, Tony Smith On The Opportunity Gap, Community Schools Listen here
Robert D. Putnam, the Peter and Isabel Malkin Professor of Public Policy at Harvard University and best-selling author of “Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community,” discusses the growing gap in social mobility among U.S. children. Jane Quinn, director of the National Center for Community Schools and vice president for Community Schools at the Children’s Aid Society, and Tony Smith, executive director of Chicago-based W. Clement and Jessie V. Stone Foundation, former superintendent Oakland Unified School District, discuss Community Schools initiatives to address inequities around the country.

October 25, 2013 – Barnard’s Debora Spar, Ann Tisch, Anne Adler on Schools for Women and Girls Listen here Debora L. Spar, president of Barnard College and former professor at Harvard Business School, discusses her new book, “Wonder Women: Sex, Power, and the Quest for Perfection,” and reveals her number one recommendation for what students, especially women, ought to learn as undergraduates. On the roundtable, Ann Rubenstein Tisch, founder, chair and president of The Young Women’s Leadership Schools (TYWLS) and Anne Adler, executive director of TYWLS, discuss the growing network of all-girls’ public schools and College Bound Initiative‘s full-time college counselors who work in high-need single-sex and co-ed public schools.

October 18, 2013 – Adaptive Learning and “Education’s Internet Moment” Listen here
Karen Cator, president and chief executive officer of Washington, D.C.-based non-profit Digital Promise, discusses “education’s Internet moment,” digital innovation in public schools, technology tools and learning environments. On the roundtable, Jessie Woolley-Wilson chair, president and chief executive officer of Bellevue, Washington-based DreamBox Learning, and Brian Fitzgerald, vice president of product development at New York City-based Knewton, discuss adaptive learning platforms, teacher training, student performance data, and classroom efficiencies.

October 11, 2013 – Actor Mark Wahlberg, Writers, Berkshire & Gabor, on Shifts in Education Listen here
Actor and film producer Mark Wahlberg discusses completing his “toughest role” – earning his high school degree, the juvenile justice system, and the importance of role models. On the roundtable, “Edushyster” blogger Jennifer Berkshire, a freelance journalist and contributing writer to “The Chronicle of Philanthropy,” and author Andrea Gabor, a professor at Baruch College and a Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism judge for applicants to the Knight-Bagehot Fellowship Program in Business and Economics, discuss turnaround schools, teacher support, leadership and some “unintended consequences” of education reform.

October 4, 2013 – Author Amanda Ripley on “Smart-Kids Countries” Listen here
Amanda Ripley, a contributor to “Time” magazine and “The Atlantic” and author of the best-selling book “The Smartest Kids in The World: And How They Got That Way,” discusses teaching methods, assessments, school sports, and conclusions to be made from chronicling “smart-kid” countries like Finland, Poland and South Korea. A student who studied in South Korea for a year and is one of three American high school exchange students profiled in Ripley’s book joins the discussion.

September 27, 2013 – Eli Broad, Houston Schools Superintendent Grier on Urban Education Listen here
Eli Broad, philanthropist and creator of two Fortune 500 companies, discusses his native Detroit public schools, blended learning, school leadership and a national system for education. Terry Grier, superintendent of the Houston Independent School District, the winner of the 2013 Broad Prize for Urban Education, discusses improved student achievement, scholarship dollars for graduating seniors, and the need for partners in public education.

September 20, 2013 – America Achieves Chair, Education Writers on School Success Listen here
Jon Schnur, executive chairman of America Achieves, a nonprofit incubator for educational initiatives, discusses a survey comparing U.S. high school students to their international peers, the Common Core and new census data on childhood poverty. Annie Murphy Paul, a Spencer Fellow at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and author of the forthcoming book: “Brilliant – The New Science of Smart,” and Alfie Kohn, author of 12 books including “Feel Bad Education,” discuss the purpose of education, measures of success in school and in life.

September 13, 2013 – Former Teachers on Why They No Longer Teach Listen here
Former teachers Dan Brown, director of Washington, D.C.-based Future Educators Association, George Stern, a student at Harvard Law School, and Kaycee Eckhardt, an education and literacy consultant to non-profit organizations including Student Achievement Partners, crafters of the Common Core standards, discuss their commitment to their students, their passion for public education and why they decided to leave the teaching profession.

September 6, 2013 – “TEACH: Director Davis Guggenheim, Roundtable on Why Teachers Teach Listen here
Filmmaker Davis Guggenheim discusses what it means to be an effective teacher and “TEACH,” a television special that documents four teachers throughout an academic school year. On the roundtable, teachers Derek Thomas, H.B. Plant High School, Tampa, Florida, Dan Tobin, Rindge Avenue Upper School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and Abby Morton-Garland, who teaches history in the morning and is an assistant principal in the afternoon at KIPP University Prep in San Antonio, discuss their classrooms, school leadership and why they teach.

August 30, 2013 – Experts on Medical Education, Teacher Training Programs Listen here
Kate Walsh, president of the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ), discusses the advocacy organization’s new “Teacher Prep Review” published by “U.S. News & World Report.” Lee Shulman, professor emeritus, Stanford University School of Education and past president, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, and Ron Thorpe, president and chief executive officer, National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, discuss teacher training programs and “The Flexner Report, which transformed medical education 100 years ago. This program originally aired on June 21, 2013.

August 23, 2013 – Geoffrey Canada, Filmmaker Joe Brewster, Mocha Moms Cheli English-Figaro and Sheila Gardner on American Dream (Unfulfilled) Listen here Fifty years after the March on Washington, Geoffrey Canada, president and chief executive officer of the Harlem Children’s Zone, discusses African-American males and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s unfulfilled dream. Psychiatrist, filmmaker Joe Brewster discusses black achievement and “American Promise,” a documentary film he created with his partner and wife, human rights lawyer Michèle Stephenson. Mocha Moms Cheli English-Figaro and Sheila Gardner discuss the non-profit organization’s “Occupy Schools” initiative to promote parent involvement and engagement in their children’s education.

August 16, 2013 – Educators on How Tablets are Changing Schools Listen here Sara Schapiro, director of the League of Innovative Schools at Washington, D.C.-based Digital Promise, Mark Sullivan, principal of Burlington High School in Massachusetts, Michael Muir, leader of Multiple Pathways for Maine’s Auburn School Department and Linda Clark, superintendent of Idaho’s Meridian Joint Schools District No. 2 discuss the use of iPads and other tablets in K-12 education. This program originally aired on May 17, 2013.

August 9, 2013 – Researcher Peter W. Cookson, Jr., on Education Equity, Mobility | Writers Discuss Segregation in Schools Listen here  Peter W. Cookson, Jr., author, sociologist and a senior fellow at Education Sector, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, discusses equity issues and education inequality. Education writers Sarah Garland, a staff writer at The Hechinger Report and author of “Divided We Fail: The Story of an African American Community That Ended the Era of School Desegregation” and Dana Goldstein, a Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation and a Puffin fellow at The Nation Institute, discuss segregation, desegregation and integration. This program originally aired on May 10, 2013.

August 2, 2013 – PTA President on Group’s New Initiatives | Author Talks Overcoming Math Anxiety Listen here Otha Thornton, a retired U.S. Army Lieutenant Colonel and the first black male president of the National Parent Teacher Association (PTA), discusses the child advocacy organization’s new initiatives, leadership, and expanding membership. Author Laura Overdeck discusses overcoming math anxiety and engaging in a math-centered dialogue as part of the bedtime routine.

July 26, 2013 – Advocates on Getting Students to and Through College Listen here Anthony P. Carnevale, director of the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, discusses the value of a college education, especially for students from low-income families. In addition, John Barker, dean of undergraduate and graduate students at Tufts University; Deborah Bial, president and founder of The Posse Foundation; and Jacques Steinberg, senior vice president of higher education at Say Yes to Education, discuss efforts to improve graduation rates through comprehensive pre-K-12 supports, college access and scholarships for youth who might not otherwise attend and complete higher education.

Click here to reference Center on Education and the Workforce July 2013 report, SEPARATE AND UNEQUAL: How Higher Education Reinforces the Intergenerational Reproduction of White Racial Privilege

July 19, 2013 – School System Leaders on District, Charter Partnerships Listen here
Greg Richmond, president and chief executive officer, National Association of Charter School Authorizers, discusses charter school quality, special education programs and student expulsion rates. On the roundtable, Duncan Klussmann, schools superintendent, Spring Branch Independent School District (SBISD) in Texas, Mike Feinberg, KIPP co-founder, and Jason Bernal, president, Houston’s YES Prep, discuss the SKY Partnership and collaboration across school systems.

July 12, 2013 – Science Educators on Standards, Nurturing Discovery Listen here
Martin Storksdieck, director, Board of Science Education for the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences, Margaret Honey, president and CEO of the New York Hall of Science, and science teachers Hallie Hundemer-Booth, a seventh-grade science teacher and instructional coach at Holmes Middle School in Covington, Kentucky and Nate Macon, a Skyview High School science teacher in Vancouver, Washington, discuss next generation science standards, the maker movement, and encouraging an interest in technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) among America’s youth.

July 5, 2013 – Arne Duncan on Keys to Educational Success, Reporters Talk Policy Listen here
Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education, discusses early childhood education, charter schools and reauthorization of the “No Child Left Behind” (NCLB) Act of 2001. Education reporters, Alyson Klein, Joy Resmovits and Andrew Rotherham, discuss NCLB waivers, Common Core curriculum and teachers’ unions.

June 28, 2013 – Administrators, Educators Discuss The Summer Learning Slide & Soulutions Listen here Gary Huggins, chief executive officer of the National Summer Learning Association, Bolgen Vargas, superintendent of New York’s Rochester City School District, Anne Kress, president of Monroe Community College and Jacqueline L. Bowen, executive director of academic services for Florida’s Duval County Public Schools, discuss children’s cumulative loss of academic skills over the summer months and efforts to diminish learning loss and the opportunity gap. Disclosure: Jane currently serves as Board Chair of Horizons National, a non-profit educational organization serving low-income students around the country.

June 21, 2013 – Teachers’ Teachers: What Can We Learn From The Professionalization of Medicine? Listen here Kate Walsh, president of the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ), discusses the advocacy organization’s new “Teacher Prep Review” published by “U.S. News & World Report.” Lee Shulman, professor emeritus, Stanford University School of Education and past president, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, and Ron Thorpe, president and chief executive officer, National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, discuss teacher training programs and “The Flexner Report, which transformed medical education 100 years ago.

June 14, 2013 – TED Talker Sir Ken Robinson, Teachers on Creativity in School Listen here
Sir Ken Robinson, educator, author and most-viewed speaker on TED.com, discusses creativity in education, the economy and the “oppressive culture” of standardized testing. Kate Baker, Seattle elementary school visual arts teacher and Keith Bisaillon, Colorado Springs high school music teacher, band director and assistant wrestling coach discuss the arts in education. The teachers segment originally aired in January 2013.

June 7, 2013 – Roundtable on Economics of Investing in Early Learning Listen here

Study after study shows that the sooner a child begins learning the better he or she does down the road. But today, fewer than 3 in 10 four-year-olds are enrolled in a high-quality preschool program. Remarks by the President in the State of the Union Address, February 12, 2013

Sara Watson of ReadyNation, a business partnership for early childhood and economic success, W. Steven Barnett of the National Institute for Early Education Research at Rutgers University, Ann O’Leary of the Children & Families Program at Next Generation and Kris Perry of the First Five Years Fund discuss the current state of preschool and President Obama’s push for high-quality early education expansion.

Why does investing in early education matter? To find out, we contacted Nobel Memorial Prize winner in Economics James J. Heckman, a professor at The University of Chicago and an expert in the economics of human development. He wasn’t able to join the program but his work almost speaks for itself. Click through to the Heckman Equation here.

May 31, 2013 – Vicki Phillips and Randi Weingarten Share Common Ground Listen here
Vicki Phillips, director of U.S. programs in education for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, discuss teacher evaluation and development, standardized tests and Common Core State Standards implementation. In March, Phillips and Weingarten co-authored sponsored content published in The New Republic. You can read their comments here.

Read more about the Gates Foundation’s Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) here and the American Federation of Teachers statement on Teacher Development and Evaluation here.

 

May 24, 2013 – Gates Foundation’s Don Shalvey on Charter Schools “2.0″ Listen here
Don Shalvey, deputy director of U.S. programs in education for the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, founder of Aspire Public Schools and a former schools superintendent, discusses charter schools, educational equity, the “real deal” on public school funding and finding common ground between traditional public and public charter school systems.

May 17, 2013 – Educators Discuss the Use of Tablets in K-12 Education Listen here Sara Schapiro, director of the League of Innovative Schools at Washington, D.C.-based Digital Promise, Mark Sullivan, principal of Burlington High School in Massachusetts, Michael Muir, leader of Multiple Pathways for Maine’s Auburn School Department and Linda Clark, superintendent of Idaho’s Meridian Joint Schools District No. 2 discuss the use of iPads and other tablets in K-12 education.

May 10, 2013 – Researcher Peter W. Cookson, Jr., on Ed. Equity | Writers Discuss Segregation in Schools Listen here  Peter W. Cookson, Jr., author, sociologist and a senior fellow at Education Sector, a Washington, D.C.-based think tank, discusses equity issues and education inequality. Education writers Sarah Garland, a staff writer at The Hechinger Report and author of “Divided We Fail: The Story of an African American Community That Ended the Era of School Desegregation” and Dana Goldstein, a Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation and a Puffin fellow at The Nation Institute, discuss segregation, desegregation and integration.                                                     Read more by Sarah on gifted programs here and by Dana on bussing here.

May 3, 2013 – 2013 National Teacher of the Year | Columbine Survivor on School Safety Listen here  2013 National Teacher of the Year Jeff Charbonneau, who teaches science at Zillah High School in Washington state, discusses making school relevant. Elementary school art teacher Katie Lyles, who was a student at Columbine High School the day of the 1999 killings, discusses school safety, bully prevention and mental health programs.

April 26, 2013 – Professor Dan Koretz, Reporters Roundtable on High Stakes Testing Listen here
Dan Koretz, professor and director of the Education Accountability Project at Harvard University, John Merrow, PBS NewsHour education correspondent and president of Learning Matters, an independent production company, Kevin Riley, Atlanta Journal Constitution editor in chief, and Greg Toppo, USA Today national K-12 education reporter, discuss the effects and increased pressure of high stakes testing on education, test tampering indictments of 35 educators in Atlanta and renewed discussion about standardized test score irregularities in the District of Columbia.

April 26, 2013 - Michelle Rhee Discusses Possible Test Score Tampering Listen here
In a show that originally aired April 1 – 3, 2011, Michelle Rhee, former Washington, D.C. public schools chancellor, discusses allegations of standardized test cheating while she ran the district’s schools. She defends student testing as an integral component of teacher evaluation. This is a reposting of the conversation that took place in 2011.

April 18, 2013  Laurene Powell Jobs, Davis Guggenheim on U.S. Immigration Reform  Listen here
Laurene Powell Jobs, founder of Emerson Collective, and filmmaker Davis Guggenheim discuss education, the economy and “The Dream is Now,” an online and broadcast campaign to promote passage of immigration reform for undocumented youth who came to the United States as young children.

April 12, 2013  Del. Gov. & Ed. Secretary on Learning Initiatives, Providence, R.I. Mayor on Literacy Effort   Listen here Delaware Governor Jack Markell and Secretary of Education Mark Murphy discuss just-released educator survey results, early learning, data-driven instruction, the digital divide and desegregation. Delaware was one of only two states (Tennessee was the other) to receive first-round fundingin the federal Race to the Top grant program. We hear about the state’s progress implementing plans. Providence, Rhode Island Mayor Angel Taveras discusses the city’s award-winning project, Providence Talks, to improve early childhood literacy. Download podcast.

April 5, 2013 – Tom Kane, Teach For America’s New Co-CEOs on Teachers | Listen Here |Tom Kane, professor of education and economics at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, discusses the Gates Foundation’s Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) project. Elisa Villanueva Beard and Matthew Kramer, co-chief executive officers of Teach for America (TFA), discuss their careers and plans for the organization, which recruits college graduates to teach in low-income communities. To kick off and prepare themselves for their new jobs, they are leading a listening tour across the United States. Jane finds out what they’ve learned to date.

March 28, 2013 – John Gomperts, Bob Balfanz on Graduation Rates, Wendy Spencer on Americorps Listen here John Gomperts, president and chief executive officer of America’s Promise Alliance, and Robert Balfanz, co-director of the Everyone Graduates Center and a research scientist at the Center for Social Organization of Schools at Johns Hopkins University, discuss increasing high school graduation rates and findings from the 2013 “Building a Grad Nation” report. Wendy Spencer, chief executive officer of the Corporation for National and Community Service, discusses a new $15 million U.S. Department of Education partnership program to support low-performing schools’ improvement plans.

March 22, 2013 – Gates Foundation’s Cantrell, Teachers on Measures of Effective Teaching Listen here Steve Cantrell, chief research officer for education at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, discusses the goals and findings of the Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) project. Heather Werb and Derek Thomas, teachers at Florida’s Hillsborough County public schools, discuss the three-year study, classroom observations and teacher development.

March 15, 2013 – Arne Duncan, Reville on Priorities and Early Education Teachers Listen here
Arne Duncan, U.S. Secretary of Education, discusses second term priorities. Paul Reville, Harvard Graduate School of Education professor of practice and until recently Secretary of Education for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, discusses the correlation between socioeconomic status and educational attainment. This is an update to shows that originally aired in February 2013 and December 2012.

March 8, 2013 – Sandra Alberti, Teachers Roundtable on Implementing the Common Core Listen here
Sandra Alberti, director of State and District Partnerships and Professional Development for Student Achievement Partners, Toni Hull, a U.S. Department of Education Teaching Ambassador Fellow, and national board certified teachers Eric Grant and Heather Woods discuss implementation of Common Core State Standards in Math and English Language Arts.

March 1, 2013 – Sarah Carr, John Merrow, Andre Perry on New Orleans and Beyond Listen here
Sarah Carr, author of Hope Against Hope, John Merrow, education correspondent for the Public Broadcasting Service’s “NewsHour” and producer of forthcoming documentary, Rebirth: New Orleans, and Andre Perry, associate director of the Institute for Quality and Equity in Education at Loyola University, discuss the transformation of New Orleans public schools since Hurricane Katrina struck in 2005, school choice and the decentralization of public school districts.”The days of a single board running 100 or 200 schools are over, says Dr. Perry.

February 22, 2013 – Rahm Emanuel, Roundtable on Violence and Chicago Schools Listen here
Chicago Mayor
Rahm Emanuel, author and journalist Alex Kotlowitz, and WBEZeducation reporter Linda Lutton discuss the city’s struggle with violence, the role of the community, the September 2012 teachers’ strike and possible school closings.

February 15, 2013 – Neera Tanden, Teachers on Emphasis on Education Listen here

Investing in Our Children,” and President Obama’s plan for high-quality early education for all. Teachers Hannah Clements of Kramer Middle School in Washington, D.C., Brooke Peters, who is traveling around the country and visiting schools via the Odyssey Initiative, and George Stern of Harrison High School in Colorado Springs, CO, discuss the emphasis on education in the president’s State of the Union address.

February 8, 2013 – Roundtable on Education Issues to Watch in 2013 Listen here

Education writers Dana Goldstein, Anya Kamenetz, Alyson Klein, and Andrew Rotherham, discuss federal funding for early education, rising racial and socioeconomic segregation, digital learning, school choice, teacher evaluation, Common Core Standards, and “Elementary and Secondary Education Act” waivers and reauthorization.

February 1, 2013 – Football Coaches on School Sports, Character Development and Safety Listen here

Lou DiRienzo, New Rochelle High School coach and Baltimore Ravens player Ray Rice’s mentor, Jon Kitna, Tacoma, Washington’s Lincoln High School graduate, coach, teacher, and former Dallas Cowboys quarterback, and Jim Satterfield, a college, high school, and now flag-football coach, discuss community, adversity and gridiron safety.

February 1, 2013 – Education Secretary Arne Duncan Worries About Inequity Listen here

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan discusses poverty, social equity, Race to the Top funding and his second term priorities. Duncan says increased access to early childhood education “is the best investment we can make.” Last month, The Huffington Post reported the White House is considering a major expansion of early childhood education.

January 25, 2013 – Teachers on School Safety, Bar Exam Listen here

Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, Kelly Vallianos, a National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certified teacher from Dominguez Elementary School in Carson, Calif., U.S. Department of Education Teaching Fellow Ambassadors Cindy Apalinski based in Washington, D.C. on leave from her district in Linden, New Jersey and Aaron Bredenkamp of Westside High School in Omaha, Nebraska, discuss school safety after the Sandy Hook shootings in Connecticut and developing a public school teacher bar exam.

January 18, 2013 -Educators Discuss the Role of the Arts in Schools Listen here

Ayanna Hudson, director of arts education for the National Endowment for the Arts, Kate Baker, Seattle elementary school visual arts teacher, Keith Bisaillon, Colorado Springs high school music teacher, band director and assistant wrestling coach, and Beth Eppler, Oklahoma City elementary through high school dance teacher, discuss the arts in education.

January 11, 2013 – School and Public Librarians on the Future of Libraries Listen here

Cleveland’s Buffy J. Hamilton and Nashville’s Tricia Bengel, educators and technologists, James Collins, district librarian, Soledad Unified School District, and Tasara Redekopp, librarian, Alice Deal Middle School in Washington, D.C., and Jody Howard, dean of the Palmer School of Library and Information Science at Long Island University, discuss the role of the 21st century librarian and the impact of technology on libraries and the community. The segments were recorded on November 27 and 28, 2012.

January 4, 2013 – Paul Tough, Dave Levin, Dominic Randolph on Character, Grit Listen here

Paul Tough, author and speaker, discusses his book, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character. Dave Levin, co-founder and superintendent of the KIPP charter school network, and Dominic Randolph, head of Riverdale Country School, discuss the teachability of non-cognitive skills such as “zest and optimism.” The segments originally aired in 2012.

December 14, 2012 – Paul Reville, Roundtable on Achievement Gap, Early Education Listen here

Massachusetts Secretary of Education Paul Reville discusses standards, assessments, accountability and the correlation between socioeconomic status and educational attainment. Early learning professionals Katherine Boyle of Acelero Learning, Takiema Bunche Smith of Brooklyn Kindergarten Society and Anita Harvey-Dixon of Educare Learning Network discuss preparing low-income children for school.

“The battle to close the achievement gap may be all over before kindergarten and K-12 schooling even begin,” says Massachusetts Secretary of Education Paul Reville.

“The only way to get to equity in this society,” says Reville, “is by having high expectations of our educational system, and those surrounding systems that support them, and of our teachers and our students.

“We sometimes, however, get lost in more abstract conversations about the standards and don’t spend enough time on the strategy,” says Reville.

December 7, 2012 – DuBois on Community Colleges, Roundtable on Tutoring Listen here

Glenn DuBois, chancellor of Virginia’s community colleges, discusses the commonwealth’s “rethink” on college readiness, completion and attainment. Tutoring industry executives, Arun Alagappan, president of Advantage Testing, Raymond Huntington, co-founder of Huntington Learning Center, and Scott Kirkpatrick, president of The Princeton Review, discuss academic and test preparation strategies.

November 30, 2012 – Education Week’s Sparks, Roundtable on Homeschooling Listen here

Education Week reporter Sarah D. Sparks discusses the current state and impact of homeschooling in the United States. More than two million students were homeschooled in 2010. That’s more than double what it was in 1999, says Sparks. Homeschooling parents, author Jamie Martin, former teacher Holly Longino and designer/ “babble” blogger Rachel Faucett, discuss why and how they homeschool their children.

November 23, 2012 – Wesleyan’s President Roth, Roundtable on Value of Higher Education Listen here

Michael S. Roth, president of Wesleyan University in Connecticut, discusses the value of a liberal arts education. Bloomberg News education reporters John Hechinger and Janet Lorin discuss costs and outstanding student loan debt which is about $1 trillion.

November 16, 2012 – DFER’s Joe Williams, Roundtable on Education and the Election Listen here

Joe Williams, executive director of Democrats for Education Reform, discusses the political action committee’s history and mission. Education reporters Joy Resmovits, of the “Huffington Post,” Alyson Klein, of “Education Week”, and Scott Elliott of the “Indianapolis Star”, discuss education in the 2012 election.

November 9, 2012 – Brockton Principal on Proficiency, Veterans on Teaching Listen here

Susan Szachowicz, retiring principal of Brockton High School in Massachusetts, discusses turning one of the state’s lowest-performing schools into one of the highest. Military veterans turned teachers, Craig Savery of Brockton High School in Massachusetts, Brian Thompson, of Cardoza High School in Washington, D.C., and Barry Smith, a Georgia Teaching Fellow and a member of Troops to Teachers program, discuss their careers in the classroom.

October 26, 2012 – Kaplan CEO on Higher Education Market,
Roundtable on Math “Super Schools”
Listen here

Andrew S. Rosen, chairman and chief executive officer of Kaplan, Inc. and author of “Change.edu: Rebooting for the New Talent Economy” discusses the evolving college and university marketplace. Economists and co-authors Glenn Ellison and Ashley Swanson discuss findings from their Massachusetts Institute of Technology study on high schools and math talent.

“…among demographically similar schools, some schools are far outperforming others. For example, Naperville, Ill., home of the Illinois Math[ematics] and Science Academy, has 46 high scorers while Northbrook, Ill., a really similar area on observable categories [race, income, parental education], has only five.” – Ashley Swanson

October 19, 2012 – Teachers on Identifying and Replicating Best Practices Audio

Three New York City-based teachers on hiatus from the classroom, Michelle Healy, Brooke Peters and Todd Sutler, discuss early education, class size, charter school laws, and building a community school in Brooklyn based on their Kickstarter-funded “Odyssey Initiative.”

October 19, 2012 – Governor Deval Patrick on Massachusetts Top Spot in Education Audio

Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick discusses school reform, Common Core Curriculum Standards, broadband infrastructure needs and the commonwealth’s high-ranking results from the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), also known asthe nation’s report card.

October 12, 2012 – Ron Thorpe, TNTP on Teacher Quality, Effectiveness, Retention Audio

National Board for Professional Teaching Standards President and Chief Executive Officer Ron Thorpe, a former teacher and school leader, discusses teacher certification and school culture.

“We have just under 100,000 [board certified teachers] right now which, on the one hand, sounds like a very big number,” says Thorpe. “But if you look at the whole teaching force it’s less than three percent.”

On the roundtable, TNTP (formerly “The New Teacher Project”) Chief Executive Officer Ariela Rozman and President Timothy Daly discuss teacher training, development and compensation. In 2009, TNTP published “The Widget Effect,” a report that likened teachers to interchangeable parts rather than professionals. More recently, TNTP documented “The Irreplaceables,” citing both “a failure to retain enough teachers, but a failure to retain the right teachers.” What does this mean? Listen here to find out.

October 5, 2012 – Alex Kotlowitz, Roundtable on Poverty, Teachers, School Reform Audio

Alex Kotlowitz, an author and a producer of the documentary “The Interrupters,” discusses poverty, particularly among children, and school reform. Rick Hess, education policy studies director at the American Enterprise Institute, and Dana Goldstein, a Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation, a Puffin fellow at The Nation Institute and a journalist for “The Atlantic” and other publications, discuss Chicago’s teachers’ strike and Common Core State Standards.

N.B. In February 2012, “FRONTLINE” presented the television premiere of “The Interrupters.” You can read more and download the film here at no cost.

September 28, 2012 – Union Leaders on Campaign Funding, Teachers Strike Audio

Dennis Van Roekel, president of the National Education Association, and Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, discuss presidential politics, campaign financing, the Chicago teachers’ strike, common core state standards, and community engagement.

September 28, 2012 – Phil Handy Discusses Romney’s Education Agenda Audio

Phil Handy, co-chairman of the Education Policy Committee for the Romney campaign; former chairman, Florida State Board of Education, and chief executive officer of Strategic Industries Inc., discusses Mitt Romney’s positions on school choice, Title I funding allocation, the Dream Act, and Common Core State Standards.

September 21, 2012 – Penn’s Richard Ingersoll on the Changing Face of Teachers Audio

Richard M. Ingersoll, University of Pennsylvania professor of education and sociology, discusses today’s younger, less-experienced, “ballooning” teaching force which has outpaced the number of students. To read more about his research, here’s Ingersoll’s writing in Education Week Beginning Teacher Induction: What the Data Tell Us.

September 21, 2012 – Relay’s Atkins Discusses Teacher Training Strategies Audio

Norman Atkins, Relay Graduate School of Education co-founder and director, discusses the teacher training program and strategies to “prepare more and better teachers at scale.”

September 14, 2012 – Paul E. Peterson on School Vouchers, Roundtable on Politics Audio

Paul E. Peterson, professor and director of the Program on Education Policy and Governance at Harvard University, discusses school choice and the impact of vouchers on college enrollment. On the second part of the program, Dana Goldstein of “The Nation,” and Rick Hess, Education Policy Studies director at the American Enterprise Institute, discuss the platforms of the presidential nominating campaigns, “Won’t Back Down,” the forthcoming fictional movie based on California’s parent trigger law, and the Chicago Teacher’s strike.

September 7, 2012 – Author Paul Tough on Character, Roundtable on Summer Learning Audio

Paul Tough, author and broadcaster, discusses his new book, How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity and the Hidden Power of Character. “Character is definitely a touchy word,” says Tough. It means different things to different people. What I and some of the characters in the book are trying to reclaim that word and give it a different spin.” On the second part of the program, alumni of summer enrichment programs discuss working for the same organizations where they spent their summers as children. Jane talks with Ja’Daiza Johnson of Horizons at Harley, Justina Sharrock of Harlem RBI, and Terrence Riley of Aim High. Full disclosure: Jane currently serves as Board Chair of Horizons National, a non-profit educational organization serving low-income students around the country.

August 31, 2012 – David Coleman, Teachers on Common Core State Standards Audio

David Coleman, an architect of the common core state standards , who will become the next president of the College Board in October, discusses math and literacy standards being adopted in 46 states and the District of Columbia. “For the first time, teachers and kids are going to be able to focus their work on what really matters most. To get them ready for college and career, says Coleman.” Teachers Kaycee Eckhardt, of New Orleans Charter Science and Math Academy (Sci Academy), and Michele Honeycutt of East Jessamine High School in Nicholasville, Kentucky, discuss piloting the curriculum in their classrooms.

August 24, 2012 – Janet Lorin and Rohit Chopra on Student Debt, ‘Subprime Style’ Lending Audio

Rohit Chopra, student loan ombudsman at the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), and Janet Lorin, Bloomberg News higher education reporter, discuss student loan debt and implications for federal agencies and the economy. “Regulators and agencies and the Fed may have a role to play to ensure that the market is working well and is liquid and that risk really reflects a price appropriately,” said Chopra. Last month the CFPB and the U.S. Department of Education released a report that described the boom and bust of the private student loan market in the past ten years.

August 24, 2012 – Arne Duncan on Curriculum, Teacher Tenure, Student Debt, Politics Audio

Arne Duncan, U.S. secretary of education, discusses the Common Core State Standards Initiative, student debt, teacher tenure, school choice, waivers and his plans after the presidential election. “We have a tough campaign ahead of us,” said Duncan. “And I serve at the president’s pleasure. But I’m in this for the long haul.”

August 17, 2012 – Legal Scholars Discuss Equity in Education, Deferred Action + Immigrant Youth Audio

Michael Rebell, executive director, Campaign for Educational Equity at Teachers College, Columbia University, discusses education access throughout the United States. Law professors, Alina Das of the New York University Law School and Michael A. Olivas of the University of Houston, discuss President Obama’s executive order to defer deportation of immigrants brought to the United States as children.

August 10, 2012 – New Teachers Talk About Their First Year in Classroom Audio

George Stern, a Teach for America (TFA) corps member and math teacher at Harrison High School in Colorado Springs, CO, Adam Wolf, a New Teacher Center mentored 8th grade language arts and social studies teacher at Goethe Elementary School, Chicago, Il., Stephanie Simms, a 4th grade teacher at Twinbrook Elementary School in Rockville, MD, and TFA corps member Hannah Clements, a 7th grade math teacher at Kramer Middle School, Washington, D.C., discuss training, ongoing support, collaboration, challenges, rewards and lessons learned throughout their first year as public school teachers.

August 3, 2012 – Rookie Teachers Discuss Their First Year in Classroom Audio

Victoria Mendoza, of KIPP Aspire Academy in San Antonio, Texas, Ashley Mirabile, of Brockton High School in Massachusetts, and Dan Tobin, of The Peabody School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, talk about their first and final days as new teachers…and we find out who will return to the classroom for year two.

July 27, 2012 – White House Chef Sam Kass on Wellness, Mike Lupica on Sports Audio

Sam Kass, assistant chef and senior policy advisor for healthy food initiatives at the White House, discusses first lady Michelle Obama’s trip to the 2012 Olympics and the “Let’s Move!” fitness and nutrition campaign. Mike Lupica, columnist, commentator and author, discusses team sports, children, parents and coaches.

July 20, 2012 – Jonathan Rothwell on School Zoning, Roundtable on Politics Audio

Jonathan Rothwell, senior research analyst in the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, discusses housing costs, school zoning and student performance. Rick Hess, Education Policy Studies director, American Enterprise Institute, and Dana Goldstein of “The Nation,” discuss presidential politics.

July 13, 2012 – Ben Levin, Sean Cavanagh, Amanda Ripley on Canada’s Education System Audio

Ben Levin, Ontario’s former deputy minister of education and a University of Toronto professor of education leadership and policy, Sean Cavanagh, assistant editor for “Education Week,” and Amanda Ripley, journalist and author, discuss education equity, system-wide reforms, funding across Canada’s school districts and what the United States might learn from our neighbors to the North.

July 6, 2012 – John Danner on Rocketship, Jill Barshay & Greg Toppo on Technology Audio

John Danner, chief executive officer and co-founder of Rocketship Education, a growing network of K-5 charter schools, discusses individualized learning and teacher talent. Jill Barshay, contributing editor for The Hechinger Report, and Greg Toppo, USA Today’s national K-12 education reporter, discuss education technology and games.

June 29, 2012 – Roundtables on Teaching American History Audio

K-12 teachers from around the U.S., Kim Ursetta, Lauren Jackson, Jamie Sawatzky, Emily Flores, Diana Laufenberg and Steve Moreno, discuss teaching American history in a global context.

June 22, 2012 – Greenberger, Robelen, Brennan on the 40th Anniversary of Title IX Audio

Marcia Greenberger, founder and co- president of the National Women’s Law Center, Erik Robelen, assistant editor and reporter for “Education Week” and Christine Brennan, “USA Today” sports columnist and author, discuss the history, impact and 40th anniversary of Title IX, the 1972 law that sets out to ensure gender-equity in federal funding.

June 15, 2012 – Henry Winkler on Learning Challenges, Susan Cain on Introverts Audio

Henry Winkler, actor and author, discusses being diagnosed with dyslexia at age 31 and his books about a successful underachiever and a new series, Ghost Buddy, about bullying and being responsible to one another. “How poorly you do in school has nothing to do with your brilliance,” says Winkler who thought he was “stupid…I covered all my embarrassment with humor.” On pursuing his dream, “you have to pursue it, and tenacity, stick to-it-tiveness,” he says, “will get you to where you want to go and gratitude will not allow you to be angry along the way.” Susan Cain, a former lawyer, discusses temperament, technology, social stimulation and her book “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking.”

June 8, 2012 – Teachers on Their First Year, Martinez on “Soft Skills” Audio

First year teachers, Hannah Clements, Adam Wolf and Stephanie Simms, discuss 12-hour workdays, collaboration and reflect on lessons learned. Kathy Martinez, assistant secretary of labor for disability employment policy at the U.S. Department of Labor, discusses a curriculum to teach students “skills to pay the bills.”

June 1, 2012 – John White on Education Reform, George Stern on Teaching Audio

John White, superintendent of Louisiana’s Department of Education, discusses charter schools, vouchers, teacher empowerment and the state’s new “parent trigger” law. George Stern, a rookie math teacher at Harrison High School and Teach for America corps member in Colorado Springs, Colorado, discusses student successes, failures and teacher mentorship.

May 25, 2012 – James Steyer on Digital Media & Kids; Teachers First Year in Review Audio

James Steyer, chief executive officer and founder of San Francisco-based Common Sense Media, discusses raising children with age-appropriate technology and his book “Talking Back to Facebook.” Rookie teachers, Victoria Mendoza, an 8th grade writing teacher at KIPP Aspire Academy in San Antonio, Texas, Ashley Mirabile, a writing teacher and 2011 graduate of Brockton High School in Massachusetts, and Dan Tobin, a 6th grade language arts teacher at The Peabody School in Cambridge, Massachusetts, return to the program to discuss long hours, support from colleagues, and lessons learned in their first year. Audio from the teachers September 2011 Roundtable follows New Teacher Center Ellen Moir here. In at 14:07 minutes.

May 18, 2012 – School Counselors on Student Well-Being, Rothman on College Audio

Nicole Pfleger, an elementary school counselor and the 2012 National School Counselor of the Year, John Kelly, a high school and clinical psychologist, and Kelly Vaillancourt, director of government relations at the National Association of School Psychologists, discuss students’ social, emotional and mental health needs. J.D. Rothman talks about her book, “The Neurotic Parent’s Guide to College.”

May 11, 2012 – Roundtable Discussion on “Making Teaching a Profession” Audio

Mari Koerner, professor and dean of the Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College at Arizona State University, Marc Tucker, president and chief executive officer of the National Center on Education and the Economy and author of the 1986 Carnegie Report, A Nation Prepared: Teachers for the 21st Century, and Randi Weingarten, president of the American Federation of Teachers, discuss improving teacher training and pay.

“We have to believe change is possible.” ~ Mari Koerner

“The question is whether we are prepared to pay for them [quality teachers], train them well and create the conditions under which they can do the work we want them to do.” ~ Marc Tucker

“There’s something very special about teaching. We should celebrate that.” ~ Randi Weingarten

May 4, 2012 – Kate Walsh on Ranking Education Schools, Teachers on Testing Audio

Kate Walsh, president of the National Council on Teacher Quality, discusses “U.S. News & World Report” rankings of education schools to be published in 2013. First-year teachers Stephanie Simms, who teaches 4th grade at Twinbrook Elementary School in Rockville, Maryland, and Benjamin Bauer, who teaches 7th grade English Language Arts at KIPP:Tulsa in Oklahoma, talk about student preparation for standardized tests and teacher evaluation based on scores.

April 27, 2012 – Anna Quindlen on Parenting, Rebecca Mieliwocki on Teacher of Year Audio

Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Anna Quindlen discusses reading, writing, parenting and her new memoir, “Lots of Candles, Plenty of Cake.” Monica Bertran, of Bloomberg News, and 2012 National Teacher of the Year Rebecca Mieliwocki, from Burbank, California, discuss teaching, collaborating and winning the award.

April 20, 2012 – Roundtable on Brain Development, Bill Nye on Science Audio

Sandra Aamodt, former editor in chief of “Nature Neuroscience” and Sam Wang, associate professor at Princeton University, co-authors of “Welcome to Your Child’s Brain: How the Mind Grows From Conception to College,” discuss brain development and kindergarten readiness. Bill Nye “the Science Guy” discusses science pedagogy.

April 13, 2012 – Geoffrey Canada on Martin Case, Roundtable on Poverty, Education Outcomes Audio

Harlem Children’s Zone President and Chief Executive Officer Geoffrey Canada discusses college admissions, student debt and lessons learned from the Trayvon Martin case. “I don’t agree, that you know, black kids shouldn’t wear hoodies,” says Canada. “I don’t agree with that. I do agree that black kids better understand that they could be perceived in certain ways when they have that hoodie on and they should understand that and be able to adjust their behavior accordingly.”

Helen F. Ladd, a professor of public policy and economics at Duke University, and Edward B. Fiske, founder and editor of the Fiske Guide to Colleges and former education editor at The New York Times, discuss the correlation between family socioeconomics and academic achievement. In December 2011, Ladd and Fiske wrote an op-ed, “Class Matters. Why Wont We Admit It?” based on research by Stanford University’s Sean Reardon.

April 5, 2012 – Barnett, Killins, Grafwallner Discuss Early Education Audio

Steve Barnett, director of the National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER), Sherri Killins, Massachussetts commissioner of early education, and Rolf Grafwallner, Maryland’s assistant state superintendent for early childhood development, discuss preschool education. They talk in anticipation of NIEER April 10 release of the 2011 State of Preschool Yearbook. The report outlines states’ efforts to deliver high-quality preschool education to children most in need and presents data on state-funded prekindergarten during the 2010-2011 school year, including rankings of all 50 states on quality standards, funding and access to state preschool programs since 2001.

March 30, 2012 – College Admissions Officers Discuss Cost, Aid, Debt Audio

Janet Lorin, Bloomberg News higher education reporter, discusses the cost of college and U.S. student-loan debt. Undergraduate deans of admissions, Charles Deacon of Georgetown University and Gary L. Ross of Colgate University, discuss this year’s applicant pool and the “value” of higher education. Deacon and Ross estimate the per-year cost of tuition plus fees, room and board at their respective universities could exceed $60,000 in 2013.

March 23, 2012 – Education Leaders Discuss Teacher Training, Development Audio

Angelo Gavrielatos of the Australian Education Union, Haldis Holst of the Norwegian Teachers Union, Paul Taillefer of the Canadian Teachers Federation, Fred van Leeuwen of Education International, and Dennis Van Roekel of the National Education Association, compare education around the world. Leaders gathered in New York City last week for the second International Summit on the Teaching Profession, organized by the U.S. Department of Education in partnership with the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), teachers’ unions, Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS), Asia Society and WNET.

March 16, 2012 – D.C. Chancellor Henderson, Teachers Discuss Evaluation Audio

Kaya Henderson, Washington D.C. schools chancellor, and public school teachers Eira McDaniel of Niles High School, James Boutin of the Academy for Citizenship and Empowerment in the Highline School District of SeaTac, Washington and Hannah Clements of Kramer Middle School in Washington, D.C., discuss development, support and evaluation based on student performance.

March 9, 2012 – Loveless, Ripley Compare Education Around the World Audio

Tom Loveless, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and author of the 2012 Brown Center Report on American Education, and Amanda Ripley, a journalist and author, discuss student test scores and teacher preparation around the world.

March 2, 2012 – Ted Mitchell, Entrepreneurs Discuss Education Startups Audio

Ted Mitchell, president and chief executive officer of the NewSchools Venture Fund, discusses venture philanthropy. Zach Sims, a college dropout and co-founder of Codecademy and Daniel Yoo, a former special education teacher and co-founder of Goalbook, discuss launching for-profit education innovations. In late 2011, Codecademy raised $2.5M in funding from Union Square Ventures, O’Reilly AlphaTech Ventures, CrunchFund, and others. More recently, Goalbook announced early stage funding from NewSchools Venture Fund’s new Education Technology Seed Fund.

February 24, 2012 – Sarah Carr, NOLA Principals on District and Charter Schools Audio

Sarah Carr, education writer, “New Orleans Times-Picayune” reporter and former Spencer fellow, discusses charter schools. Cheryllyn Branche, principal of Benjamin Banneker Elementary School, and Sharon Clark, director of Sophie B. Wright Charter School, discuss public education in New Orleans where 80 percent of the students attend charter schools, up from less than 5 percent before Katrina.

February 17, 2012 – Duncan, Bennet, Reporters on ‘No Child’ Law Waivers Audio

U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, Colorado Senator Michael Bennet, The Hechinger Report‘s Sarah Garland, and Bloomberg News reporter John Hechinger discuss the federal government’s decision to exempt states from the “No Child Left Behind” (NCLB) law. “This waiver is allowing us…to use an entirely different system for judging the performance of our schools, the performance of our teachers, and of our kids,” says Bennet. “We are very happy to be out from under the pieces of the law that just don’t make sense.”
Note: Since this segment was recorded on February 14, New Mexico became the 11th state to receive an NCLB exemption.

February 10, 2012 – Roundtable on Career and Technical Education Audio

Melinda Karp, a researcher at the Community College Research Center (CCRC) at Teachers College, Columbia University, Julie Reis, a biotechnology teacher at Abraham Lincoln High School in San Francisco and Michael Werner, a manufacturing instructor at Granite Falls High School in Washington State, discuss applied skills courses in high school and college, and career-readiness.

February 10, 2012 – Fitzgerald on Schools for Military Dependents Audio

Marilee Fitzgerald, director of the Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA), discusses schools for military dependents. DoDEA coordinates and manages pre-kindergarten through 12th grade education programs for approximately 87,000 students in the U.S. and overseas.

February 3, 2012 – Immelt, Hawkins, Johnson on STEM Education, Skills Audio

Jeffrey R. Immelt, chief executive officer of General Electric Co. and chair of President Obama’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness, discusses graduating more engineers. Wendy Hawkins, executive director Intel Foundation, the sponsor of the the Intel Science Talent Search and the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair, and Maggie Johnson, Google’s director of education and a Google Science Fair judge, discuss developing and rewarding 21st century scientific talent.

January 30, 2012 – Richard Barth and Dave Levin Discuss KIPP School Network Audio

Richard Barth, chief executive officer, Dave Levin, co-founder of the KIPP charter school network, discuss the path “to and through college” and their vision of a sustainable school model.

January 20, 2012 – Roundtable on Education Reform in an Election Year Audio

Jonathan Kaufman, education editor at Bloomberg News, Dana Goldstein of “The Nation,” Alyson Klein of “Education Week,” and Alexander Russo of “This Week in Education,” discuss policy changes and challenges one year after President Obama’s 2011 State of the Union Address. How much has changed since the President’s plea for flexibility and a focus on what is best for children? They talk with Jane Williams on Bloomberg Radio’s “Bloomberg EDU.”

January 13, 2012 – NEA’s Van Roekel on Teacher Evaluations, Polarization Audio

Dennis Van Roekel, president of the National Education Association, discusses professional accountability tied to federal “Race to the Top” funding and the “polarized policy climate” after Nancy Carlsson-Paige, an education professor, and her son, Matt Damon, refused an NEA award.

January 13, 2011 – Levin, Randolph Discuss ‘Character Education’ Audio

Dave Levin, co-founder of the KIPP charter school network, and Dominic Randolph, head of Riverdale Country School, discuss character education. Levin says traits like “zest, grit, optimism and curiosity” are teachable skills and as important to life outcomes as reading and math.

January 6, 2012 – Panel Discusses Teacher Demographics, Training Audio

C. Emily Feistritzer of the National Center for Education Information, Michael Lach of the University of Chicago and Talia Milgrom-Elcott of the Carnegie Corporation of New York discuss Corporation of New York discuss shifting teacher demographics and a plan to train 100,000 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) teachers in ten years.

December 16, 2011 – Bello, Olivas, Hauser on Immigration Laws, Youth Audio

Kemi Bello, an American-educated, undocumented immigrant from Nigeria, Michael A. Olivas, a law professor at the University of Houston and “No Undocumented Child Left Behind” author, and Brooke Hauser, “The New Kids” author, discuss the DREAM Act, “coming out,” and education options for immigrant youth.

December 9, 2011 – Stern, Mills on Teaching, Testing, College Admissions Audio

George Stern, a first year Teach for America corps member in Colorado Springs, Colorado, talks about classroom management, teacher effectiveness and performance pay. Nicolaus Mills, a professor at Sarah Lawrence College, discusses cheating on college admissions tests.

December 2, 2011 – Davidson, Roundtable on Shifting Focus, Technology Audio

Cathy N. Davidson, a Duke University professor and author of “Now You See It,” discusses digital age learning and attention. Greg Green, a high school principal in Michigan, Wendy and Stacey Roshan, mother and daughter math teachers in Virginia and Maryland, discuss the “flipped classroom.”

November 28, 2011 – Researchers, Nonprofit Leaders Discuss School Absences Audio

Robert Balfanz of Johns Hopkins University’s Everyone Graduates Center, Hedy Nai-Lin Chang of Attendance Works, Marie Groark of the Get Schooled Foundation and Heidi Stevens of Schools Every Day, discuss chronic absences among early learners, its impact on school communities, and high school graduation rates.

November 18, 2011 – Arne Duncan on Penn State, ‘No Child,’ Tilson on Reform Audio

Arne Duncan, U.S. secretary of education, discusses the Penn State child abuse scandal, the federal government’s role in education and “No Child Left Behind” waivers. Whitney Tilson, founder and managing partner of T2 partners and Tilson Mutual Funds, discusses education reform.

November 14, 2011 – Rieckhoff on Veterans, Roundtable on Character Audio

Paul Rieckhoff, director of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America discusses the GI Bill. U.S. Army Col. Jack H. Jacobs (Ret.), Heather Kensill, a project facilitator, and Jay Badams, Erie, Pennsylvania schools superintendent, discuss student character.

November 4, 2011 – Gov. Christie on Education, Lorin on College Board Audio

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie discusses public education and reform. U.S. Christie says Secretary of Education Arne Duncan deserves high marks for empowering states to take risks to bolster school success. Bloomberg News Reporter Janet Lorin discusses the College Board.

October 28, 2011 – Rosalind Wiseman, Researchers Discuss Bullying Audio

Rosalind Wiseman, author of “Queen Bees & Wannabes,” Susan Limber, Clemson University professor of psychology, and Justin Patchin, co-director of the Cyberbullying Research Center and associate professor at the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, discuss bullying prevention and response.

October 21, 2011 – Hess on Achievement Gap, Roundtable on ‘No Child’ Audio

Rick Hess, Education Policy Studies director at the American Enterprise Institute, discusses “the achievement gap.” National Journal correspondent Fawn Johnson, Bloomberg reporter John Hechinger and education blogger Alexander Russo discuss “No Child Left Behind.”

October 17, 2011 – Dolan on Enrollment, New Teachers on Parents Audio

Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan discusses declining Catholic school enrollment and the economy. First-year teachers, Ashley Earl, George Stern and Adam Wolf, discuss their workday and interactions with parents.

October 07, 2011 – Author Peg Tyre, Teachers on Parents, Schools Audio

Author Peg Tyre discusses her new book, “The Good School: How Smart Parents Get Their Kids the Education They Deserve.” First-year teachers, Hannah Clements, Carla Palacios and Stephanie Simms, discuss working inside and outside the classroom.

September 30, 2011 – Smith, Casey Discuss Poverty, Reading, Education Audio

Ralph Smith, executive vice president of the Annie E. Casey Foundation and Vicki L. Phillips, director of education for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation discuss poverty, reading as a predictor of student success and measures of teacher effectiveness.

September 23, 2011 – Roundtable on ‘American Teacher,’ ‘No Child’ Law Audio

Filmmakers Vanessa Roth and Ninive Calegari, and teacher Jamie Fidler discuss “American Teacher.” Andrew Rotherham, TIME.com columnist, and Dana Goldstein, a contributing writer to “The Nation” and “The Daily Beast,” discuss the Republican presidential candidates’ education views and the Obama Administration’s “No Child” law waiver guidelines.

September 16, 2011 – Moir, New Teachers Discuss Classroom Collaboration Audio

Ellen Moir, executive director of Santa Cruz, California-based New Teacher Center, discusses how to help teachers grow through support, training and mentorship. New teachers, Victoria Mendoza, Ashley Mirabile and Dan Tobin, discuss September challenges and rewards.

September 9, 2011 – Arne Duncan on Economy, Education, History on 9/11 Audio

Arne Duncan, U.S. secretary of education, discusses the economy, politics and his Great Lakes region bus tour. Adam Strom and Tracy Garrison-Feinberg, of Facing History and Ourselves, an international non-profit network of educators, discuss teaching about Sept. 11.

September 2, 2011 – Stewart, Klemmer on Youth Programs, Librarians on Potter Audio

Ashley Stewart, senior director of Baltimore’s National Summer Learning Association, discusses programs for low-income students. Tony Klemmer, president of The Center for Better Schools, discusses innovations in teacher training for high-performing teachers. Mary Sorhus and Gretchen Kolderup, Connecticut librarians, discuss “Harry Potter.”

August 26, 2011 – Neu, Dolan, Foley, Mayers Discuss Special EducationAudio

Jessica Neu, a fifth grade “inclusion” teacher in Morristown, New Jersey, discusses the history, laws and trends in special education. Fran Dolan, Steve Foley and Linda Mayers, parents of special education students, discuss advocating, community support and funding to meet their children’s needs in public schools.

August 19, 2011 – Brill, Goldstein, Russo Discuss School Reform Politics Audio

Steven Brill, founder of Court TV and author of “Class Warfare: Inside the Fight to Fix America’s Schools,” Dana Goldstein, a contributing writer to “The Nation” and an education writer and author of “Stray Dogs, Saints and Saviors,” discuss Brill’s book, and the social, political and financial factors of education reform.

August 12, 2011 – Reporter Greg Toppo on Teachers Tampering With Tests Audio

Greg Toppo, USA Today’s national K-12 education reporter, discusses the pressure of high-stakes standardized tests and the link to teachers tampering with tests.

August 12, 2011 – Baltimore Schools Chief Alonso Discusses Urban Education